Hallonbergen (Tub3, line 11)

Hallonbergen station was opened on 31 August 1975.

Hallonbergen, located in Sundbyberg (Sweden's smallest municipality in area, and its second-densest, after Stockholm), is a fairly typical 1970s area of dense housing, shops and services.



Hallonbergens centrum, night view

(19 January 2002)
This night view shows the front of the building at Hallonbergens centrum that includes the shopping center and the tunnelbana station (entrance at the lower right).



Hallonbergen, mezzanine

(19 January 2002)
Inside the paid area, this mezzanine leads to both platforms (the photo is a bit dark, but you can see the two signs indicating the two platforms). One platform, used for northbound trains, contains platform face 2 only (there is no platform face 1). The other contains platform faces 3 and 4. Platform 4 is used for southbound service trains coming from Kista and continuing to Näckrosen. Platform 3 is usually used for movements into and out of Rissne depot, which is accessible from here. Before 1985, trains on both lines (to Akalla and Hjulsta) ran via Solna centrum and Hallonbergen; trains to Hjulsta ran from platform 3, running next to and practically through Rissne depot before reaching Rinkeby, and trains to Akalla ran from platform 2.



Hallonbergen, southbound platform with ceiling

(19 January 2002)
This photo, which is also a tad dark, shows the current southbound platform (platforms 3 and 4) with a train to Kungsträdgården arriving on platform 4. This view illustrates the construction of the ceiling, with lighting and other equipment built into metal boxes suspended from the true rock ceiling.



Hallonbergen, southbound platform

(19 January 2002)
The southbound platform at Hallonbergen. Platform 4, the southbound service platform, is on the left, and platform 3, mostly used for stock moves to and from the depot, is on the right.



Hallonbergen, southbound platform, two trains

(19 January 2002)
Another view of the southbound platform, with a southbound train in service departing, and a train running light entering the station to proceed into the depot (behind us in this view).



Hallonbergen, artwork on track wall (track 3)

(19 January 2002)
This view shows some of the station artwork, on the track wall of track 3. This art is typical of the style in the station.



Hallonbergen, train on its way to Rissne depot

(19 January 2002)
The empty train entering Hallonbergen on its way to Rissne depot.



Hallonbergen, empty train stopped

(19 January 2002)
The same empty train, stopped at Hallonbergen waiting for a signal to clear.



Hallonbergen, empty train stopped

(19 January 2002)
Another view of the empty train.



Hallonbergen, art between platforms

(19 January 2002)
More artwork, this time in a space between the platforms. The platform on the other side is platform 2 (for northbound trains, to Akalla).



Hallonbergen, elevator and platform-end gate

(19 January 2002)
Pepto-Bismol, anyone?... This color is used for most of the fixtures in the station. Here we see an elevator (from platforms 3 and 4) and the gate at the end of the platform that prevents unauthorized access to the tracks.



Hallonbergen, platform 2

(19 January 2002)
Platform 2, the northbound platform, looking timetable south.



Hallonbergen, art between platforms

(19 January 2002)
Another view of art placed between the platforms, this time seen from platform 2.



Hallonbergen, platform 2, gate and emergency exit

(19 January 2002)
The locked gate and emergency exit at the end of platform 2.



Hallonbergen, platform 2 from south end

(19 January 2002)
A long view of platform 2 from its south end.



Hallonbergen, graffiti behind gate

(19 January 2002)
Behind the gate at the south end of platform 2, some rather striking graffiti.



Hallonbergen, artwork with Wells Fargo wagon

(19 January 2002)
This artwork on the wall of platform 2 shows a Wells Fargo wagon, which I thought was an amusing thing to find in Sweden.



Hallonbergen, southbound platform, coupling kiosk

(19 January 2002)
This photo shows something called a "kopplingskiosk," literally a "coupling kiosk," on the southbound platform at Hallonbergen. These kiosks are located usually at terminal stations on the tunnelbana, and are used by staff performing coupling and uncoupling of cars on service trains. They generally contain tools used for coupling, but the kiosk at Hjulsta has been outfitted with a coffee pot, cookies, and other coffee-break stuff by the driver who usually performs the afternoon and evening coupling duties on Tub3.



Hallonbergen, southbound platform, hopscotch field

(19 January 2002)
On the southbound platform, a hopscotch field etched into the tile.



Hallonbergen, track 3, signal

(19 January 2002)
This photo too is a bit dark, but I included it because it shows the signal regulating northbound moves from track 3 (e.g., into the depot from Hallonbergen). This signal is typical of many of the signals used in the tunnelbana, especially on Tub2 and Tub3. (Many of the signals on Tub1 were replaced with a more "railroad-like" type with a backplate when the signalling system on Tub1 was replaced, 1997-1999.)



Hallonbergen, 'compass'

(19 January 2002)
This shot shows a north-south indicator on the southbound platform, giving an idea of how much the line deviates from a true north-south axis at this station.



Hallonbergen, southbound train arriving

(19 January 2002)
A southbound train arriving at Hallonbergen.

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